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2009.7

2009.7

Most bus demand is confined to slow lanes outside the BRT system
2009.7

2009.7

2009.7

Bus stop behind a BRT station
2009.7

2009.7

2009.7

Regular buses use the front of the station, and BRT buses the rear, with a partition in the middle of the station
2009.7

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2009.7

Hangzhou Huochezhan BRT station & bus terminal
2008.9

2008.9

Only one bus can open doors at the station at one time. The others have to queue
2008.9

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2008.9

In phase 2, Hangzhou's BRT reverts to a curbside bus lane with bus bays. A negative impact on buses, bicycles and pedestrians can be expected
2008.9

2007.12

18m, 4 door Euro III diesel BRT bus manufactured by Jinhua Neoplan
2007.12

Hangzhou's BRT is now open to 12m 'feeder' buses serving 4 routes in addition to the two trunk line 18m BRT bus routes. The low demand makes this kind of queue a rarity.
2007.12

Mixed traffic is sometimes allowed in the BRT lanes
2007.12

More than 75% of public transport demand in the BRT corridor is carried in the congested service lanes to the right of the BRT lane.
2007.12

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2007.12

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2006.7

2010.4

2009.7

Many BRT passengers prefer the road to the bridge
2009.7

Young Man and young woman
2009.7

2009.7

2008.9

Single file cyclists passing a bus stop behind a BRT bus, outside the BRT corridor
2007.12

2007.12

2007.12

Sign showing the 2 trunk and 4 feeder BRT routes
2007.12

2006.7

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2006.7

Bicycles and BRT: the future of urban transportation in China?
2006.7

杭州 BRT